Illicit Drug Use

Illicit drugs can trap users in a downward spiral of addiction.

Why it Matters

In 2016-2017 there were 217 ambulance call-outs in relation to illicit drug use in the City of Wyndham - just over 4 per week.

Behind each of these incidents is a personal story – a human tragedy.  Too often they involve a young person and their family.

Illicit drugs trap users in a downward spiral of addiction. They are inextricably linked with adverse mental and physical health, overdose deaths, crime, violence, trauma and family breakdown.

Other parties such as the Reason Party and the Greens promote the bizarre fantasy that the ONLY problem with drugs is that they are illegal. 

The current Labor government has partially endorsed this view by supporting the opening of Victoria’s first ice and heroin injecting room. 


My Solution

  • Change the narrative around drugs away from the despairing “harm minimisation” approach that leaves young people trapped in a lifetime of drug abuse to a thorough and consistent approach of prevention and rehabilitation.
  • Involve credible experts – like the recovered ice addicts from the Australian Ant-Ice Campaign in prevention education. 
  • Drug courts which divert first time offenders to effective rehabilitation programmes.
  • Increase education within our schools on the dangers of trying drugs “even once”.
  • Support demand reduction strategies.


What I’ve Done

Spoken and voted against the Drugs, Poisons and Controlled Substances Amendment (Medically Supervised Injecting Centre) Bill 2017 (which tragically passed by just one vote).

In my speech I analysed the evidence about injecting rooms and demonstrated that the claims that they save lives are false. Rather they actually increase risk-taking behaviour.

Called on the government to fund Naltrexone implants – a genuine, successful approach to helping heroin users get and stay drug free.


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Rachel Carling-Jenkins Independent for Werribee